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Campaigners unhappy with Edinburgh Airport use of Google Glasses

Car Hire Edinburgh Airport staff have also trialled the glasses, but are not entirely sure if they will be a positive move by  the airport.

There has been a negative reaction from privacy campaigners after Edinburgh Airport announced plans for airport staff to wear controversial Google Glasses. EdinburghAirport will be the first in the UK to trial the technology in a bid to improve ‘the passenger experience’, while its use could be rolled out to other airports.

Wearers can surf the web using voice commands and take pictures just by winking. Customer service teams will use the hands-free glasses to provide flight information, translations and answer passenger inquiries until the end of the year.

Edinburgh Airport’s chief executive, Gordon Dewar, welcomed the technological addition to services, adding that it was subject to a test period. But privacy campaigners have raised concerns over the intrusion of privacy, the ethics of using the device in public and recording people without their permission.

Gordon Dewar, Chief Executive of Edinburgh Airport said “The fact that it’s the first trial of its kind in a Scottish airport is exciting as it shows we’re leading the way in how we interact with our passengers. Over the next few months we’ll be able to establish whether this product is suitable for an airport environment.”

Emma Carr, director of Big Brother Watch, said “The danger with Google Glass is that the camera is seeing what you see, all the time, while the microphone allows nearby conversations to be eavesdropped on. It is impossible to guarantee against these devices being hacked, so it is surprising that this technology is allowed anywhere like an airport or government buildings. Google Glass offers a uniquely detailed view of your life and your surroundings and while Google’s main interest is selling advertising, there are a whole range of reasons why other people might seek to do all they can to get access to a device.”