Top 5 East Midland Walks - Easirent
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Top 5 East Midland Walks

Are you flying into East Midlands Airport and looking for a way to explore the English countryside once you arrive? Why not take a drive out to one of the area’s best loved walks or nature trails? Here at Easirent we have compiled a list of our favourite outdoor adventures. Enjoy…

1. Sherwood Forest Walks

Sherwood Forest is probably one of the most famous forests in the whole of the United Kingdom due to its links with the legendary Robin Hood, who lived in the forest with his merry men. An important part of the East Midlands heritage, Sherwood Forest is also home to some of the most ancient trees in Europe. Lose yourself in the depths of the forest and visit the Major Oak, an 800 year old oak tree which relies upon steel poles to support its ancient branches.

2. Goyt Valley

Pick up your Easirent hire car from our East Midlands Airport branch and head to the Goyt Valley for a day of exploring the natural beauty of the region. Located between both Macclesfield and Buxton, the Goyt Valley is a picturesque valley on the edge of the Peak District National Park and is home to some of the most stunning scenery in the country. Leave your Easirent hire car at Goyts Lane and walk to the Errwood Reservoir, a moderate four mile walk which passes the Bunsal Incline and the Cromford and High Peak Railway Tunnel.

3. Dovedale

Located in the heart of Derbyshire, Dovedale is a stunning part of the East Midlands and is home to many different nature trails and walks. If you’re looking for an easy route then take the walk from Ilam Park to Dovedale, which begins with tranquil Victorian landscapes and passes through the limestone countryside of the southern Peak District. The route is only two and a half miles and can be completed in under an hour.

4. Millennium Walkway

The Millennium Walkway is a spectacular steel bridge which passes over the River Goyt and has been described by some as a ‘steel spider’s web’. The walkway is partially cantilevered from the sheer stone railway embankment, which is considered as ‘the finest retaining wall in the country’s rail network’. Completed in 1999, the walkway is part of one of Europe’s best walking routes, a trail which starts in Stranraer in Scotland and ends in Nice, France.

5. Black Rocks

Taking their name from the sizeable grit stone outcrop in the Cromford Moor, Black Rocks is the perfect place to spend the afternoon exploring. The top of the hill offers unparalleled views across the Derwent Valley. Visitors can take part in the two woodland trails and there are on site orienteering courses in the woodlands.