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Top 5 Newcastle Visitor Attractions

The Angel of the North

Visible from miles away, the iconic sculpture has been synonymous with the area since being erected in 1998. Designed by Sir Anthony Gormley, the world-renowned British sculptor, the structure stands on a hill on the southern edge of Low Fell, overlooking the A1 and A167 roads into Tyneside, and the East Coast Main Line rail route. The visitor site allows visitors to view the magnificent structure up close, and is accessible via the A167, just a 25-minute drive from our site at Newcastle Airport.

Theatre Royal

This historic theatre was opened in 1837 with a production of The Merchant of Venice, and its grand auditorium has stood since 1901, after the original room was destroyed by fire in 1899. The building is a beautiful monument to the golden age of neo-classical design, and its fascade is widely considered the most attractive of any UK theatre. As well as being granted royal status by King George III, the Theatre Royal is now a Grade I listed building, and remains a thriving theatre in 2015, hosting everything from Shakespeare to pantomime. A full programme of listings can be found on the theatre’s official website.

St James’ Park

What’s in a name? Well, a lot, actually. Newcastle United’s iconic home stadium was briefly renamed the Sports Direct Arena, to the outrage of the local fanbase, until the board listened to complaints and reinstated the original name the following season. The home of ‘Toon’ since 1892, St James’ is an architectural phenomenon steeped in history, and is home to some of the most passionate fans in the world of football. Walking tours of the ground are available, and tickets for home fixtures are on sale at the club’s official website.

Life Science Centre

Life sciences one of a few sectors that is expected to achieve almost immeasurable growth over the coming years, and the Life Science Centre in Newcastle is a great place to explore this field in a fun, accessible way. The centre is part of the larger International Centre for Life complex, a ‘self-sustaining science village’ employing 600 people from 35 different countries. The staff consist of esearchers, doctors and nurses working alongside professionals from the fields of education, public engagement and business. The Life Science Centre attracts over 250,000 visitors every year, and features interactive displays and participatory experiments for all ages. The Life Science Centre is bound to be an educational and enriching experience for all visitors, from curious children to science graduates.

Jesmond Dene

Jesmond Dene is a picturesque public park, located in the east end of Newcastle. The park lies on a narrow steep-sided valley of a small stream known as the Ouseburn, and is rich in greenery as well as history. The park was laid out in the 1860s, and remains extremely popular to this day. A standout feature of Jesmond is Armstrong Bridge, an iron structure which spans the Dene and now hosts an arts and crafts fair on most Sunday mornings. The park is also popular for ‘Pet’s Corner’, a free-entry petting zoo which has been a popular family attraction for decades, and features goats and alpaca. A sure-fire hit for a daytime family outing.